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Monday, 14 December 2015

The Fens Flood Plain by River Delph

Ely Cathedral in the Distance


Today, Carole and I arrived at the bird hides and we were thrilled at once when we saw the vast lake across the flood plain of the fens. The River Delph had burst her banks and flooded as always in the winter months. The water fowl move in to the delight of all. These birds come in thousands.

There was so much to see and the entire area looked so different from the summer months just a short time gone now. We walked along the dike between the flooded River Delph on one side and the parrelel canal on the other side of the dike. This side was not flooded and looked no different. 

It was not until we crossed the bridge, by the small water station, and went up the scarp of the dike, that we saw the extent of the flood plain. It looked like a whole new world - a lake world. It gave me some idea of how all of the fens must have been in the past. It was a place where bandits hi during the middle ages and Saxon resistance aginst Normans lasted longest.

Also the Ancient Britons were able to hide from the Roman Empire too. Their Ninth Legion was stationed in scattered forts along the perimeter of the Fenlands.

Once again it was a crisp and pleasant winter day in Manea. It had obviously been raining, but well before we got here.

I looked across to the Cathedral at Ely, its tower in the misty distance was the only familar sight from summer.

The River Delph's banks have overflown into the Fenland to create a vast shallow lake.






The water was spread across the Fenland



  
The water fowl were in abundance

Everywhere in the lower fen

The birds did not seem to mind

On the canel side of the dike, things went on as usual

Kestrels were hunting all over

Blue Tits were every where


There was no shortage of hunters either


We only stayed for a couple of hours, but it was a pleasant way to spend the morning. I have managed to get three blogs out of it too.


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